Paul Revere to Dr. Jeremy Belknap [1775] - History

Paul Revere to Dr. Jeremy Belknap [1775] - History

In the fall of 1774 and winter of 1775, I was one of upwards of thirty, chiefly mechanics, who formed ourselves into a committee for the purpose of watching the movements of the British soldiers, and gaining every intelligence of the movements of the Tories. We held our meetings at the Green Dragon tavern. We were so careful that our meetings should be kept secret that every time we met, every person swore upon the Bible that they would not discover any of our transactions but to Messrs. Hancock, Adams, Doctors Warren, Church and one or two more.

. In the winter, towards the spring, we frequently took turns, two and two, to watch the soldiers by patrolling the streets all night. The Saturday night preceding the 10th of April, about ~: o'clock at night, the boats belonging to the transports were all launched and carried under the sterns of the men-of-war. (They had been previously hauled up and repaired.) We likewise found that the grenadiers and light infantry were all taken off duty.

From these movements we expected something serious was to be transacted. On Tuesday evening, the 18th, it was observed that a number of soldiers were marching towards the bottom of the Common. About ~1o o'clock, Dr. Warren sent in great haste for me and begged that I would immediately set off for Lexington, where Messrs. Hancock and Adams were, and acquaint them of the movement, and that it was thought they were the objects.

When I got to Dr. Warren's house, I found he had sent an express by land to Lexington—a Mr. William Daws. The Sunday before, by desire of Dr. Warren, I had been to Lexington, to Messrs. Hancock and Adams, who were at the Rev. Mr. Clark's. I returned at night through Charlestown; there I agreed with a Colonel Conant and some other gentlemen that if the British went out by water, we would show two lanterrns in the North Church steeple; and if by land, one, as a signal; for we were apprehensive it would be difficult to cross the Charles River or get over Boston Neck. I left Dr. Warren, called upon a friend and desired him to make the signals.

I then went home, took my boots and surtout, went to the north part of the town, where I had kept a boat; two friends rowed me across Charles River, a little to the eastward where the Somerset man-of-war lay. It was then young flood, the ship was winding, and the moon was rising. They landed me on the Charlestown side. When I got into town, I met Colonel Conant and several others; they said they had seen our signals. I told them what was acting, and went to get me a horse; I got a horse of Deacon Larkin. While the horse was preparing, Richard Devens, Esq., who was one of the Committee of Safety, came to me and told me that he came down the road from Lexington after sundown that evening; that he met ten British officers, all well mounted, and armed, going up the road.

I set off upon a very good horse; it was then about eleven o'clock and very pleasant. After I had passed Charlestown Neck . I saw two men on horseback under a tree. When I got near them, I discovered they were British officers. One tried to get ahead of me, and the other to take me. I turned my horse very quick and galloped towards Charlestown Neck, and then pushed for the Medford Road. The one who chased me, endeavoring to cut me off, got into a clay pond near where Mr. Russell's Tavern is now built. I got clear of him, and went through Medford, over the bridge and up to Menotomy. In Medford, I awaked the captain of the minute men; and after that, I alarmed almost every house, till I got to Lexington. I found Messrs. Hancock and Adams at the Rev. Clark's; I told them my errand and enquired for Mr. Daws; they said he had not been there; I related the story of the two officers, and supposed that he must have been stopped, as he ought to have been there before me.

After I had been there aboue half an hour, Mr. Daws came; we refreshed ourselves, and set off for Concord. We were overtaken by a young Dr. Prescott, whom we found to be a high Son of Liberty. I told them of the ten officers that Mr. Devens met, and that it was probable we might be stopped before we got to Concord; for I supposed that after night they divided themselves, and that two of them had fixed themselves in such passages as were most likely to stop any intelligence going to Concord. I likewise mentioned that we had better alarm all the inhabitants till we got to Concord. The young doctor much approved of it and said he would stop with either of us, for the people between that and Concord knew him and would give the more credit to what we said.

We had got nearly half way. Daws and the doctor stopped to alarm the people of a house. I was about one hundred rods ahead when I saw two men in nearly the same situation as those ofFicers were near Charlestown. I called for the doctor and Mr. Daws to come up. In an instant I was surrounded by four. They had placed themselves in a straight road that inclined each way; they had taken down a pair of bars on the north side of the road, and two of them were under a tree in the pasture. The doctor being foremost, he came up and we tried to get past them; but they being armed with pistols and swords, they forced us into the pasture. The doctor jumped his horse over a low stone wall and got to Concord.

I observed a wood at a small distance and made for that. When I got there, out started six officers on horseback and ordered me to dismount. One of them, who appeared to have the command, examined me, where I came from and what my name was. I told him. He asked me if I was an express. I answered in the affirmative. He demanded what time I left Boston. I told him, and added that their troops had catched aground in passing the river, and that there would be five hundred Americans there in a short time, for I had alarmed the country all the way up. He immediately rode towards those who stopped us, when all five of them came down upon a full gallop. One of them, whom I afterwards found to be a Major Mitchel, of the sth Regiment, clapped his pistol to my head, called me by name and told me he was going to ask me some questions, and if I did not give him true answers, he would blow my brains out. He then asked me similar questions to those above. He then ordered me to mount my horse, after searching me for arms. He then ordered them to advance and to lead me in front. When we got to the road, they turned down towards Lexington. When we had got about one mile, the major rode up to the ofEcer that was leading me, and told him to give me to the sergeant. As soon as he took me, the major ordered him, if I attempted to run, or anybody insulted them, to blow my brains out.

We rode till we got near Lexington meeting-house, when the militia fired a volley of guns, which appeared to alarm them very much. The major inquired of me how far it was to Cambridge, and if there were any other road.

After some consultation, the major rode up to the sergeant and asked if his horse was tired. He answered him he was—he was a sergeant of grenadiers and had a small horse. "Then," said he, "take that man's horse." I dismounted, and the sergeant mounted my horse, when they all rode towards Lexington meeting-house.

I went across the burying-ground and some pastures and came to the Rev. Clark's house, where I found Messrs. Hancock and Adams. I told them of my treatment, and they concluded to go from that house towards Woburn. I went with them and a Mr. Lowell, who was a clerk to Mr. Hancock.

When we got to the house where they intended to stop, Mr. Lowell and myself returned to Mr. Clark's, to find what was going on. When we got there, an elderly man came in; he said he had just come from the tavern, that a man had come from Boston who said there were no British troops coming. Lowell and myself went towards the tavern, when we met a man on a full gallop, who told us the troops were coming up the rocks. We afterwards met another, who said they were close by. Lowell asked me to go to the tavern with him, to get a trunk of papers belonging to Mr. Hancock. We went up chamber, and while we were getting the trunk, we saw the British very near, upon a full march. We hurried towards Mr. Clark's house. In our way we passed through the militia. There were about fifty. When we had got about one hundred yards from the meeting-house, the British troops appeared on both sides of the meeting-house. In their front was an officer on horseback. They made a short halt; when I saw, a,,d heard, a gun fired, which appeared to be a pistol. Then I could distinguish two guns, and then a continual roar of musketry; when we made off with the trunk.


Login or Create an Account

Educators and Parents/Guardians of K-12 students may now register FREE for full website access.

If you are a K–12 educator or student, registration is free and simple and grants you exclusive access to all of our online content, including primary sources, essays, videos, and more.

For everyone else, a one-year subscription is $25, and includes access to our Collection, essays by leading historians, and special programs and events. The proceeds of your subscription will support American history education in K–12 classrooms worldwide.

After I register, what does Gilder Lehrman do with my information? Click here to read Gilder Lehrman’s Privacy Policy and to learn about how we use your information.


Paul Revere to Dr. Jeremy Belknap [1775] - History

Any tourist visiting Boston quickly learns the crucial role that the Hub played in the American Revolution. Bostonians set the pace of the rebellion from the Stamp Act protests in 1765, through the Boston Massacre in 1770, the Tea Party in 1773 and the Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775. Many leaders of the Continental Congress hailed from Boston, as did several influential newspaper publishers, pamphleteers, merchants and ministers.

But the history of the American Revolution in Boston extends beyond these human actors to the landscape of the city itself. Boston's position as a natural harbor for New England gave rise to its commercial prosperity and strong merchant class, and also placed it at the center of struggles to negotiate the boundaries of imperial trade policy. Boston's shape as a peninsula attached to the mainland by a thin strip of land at the Neck made it an easy town for the British Regulars to occupy and fortify.

The map above, drawn by Richard Williams in 1776, is one of many that depict Boston and the surrounding areas and waterways during the American Revolution. This map emphasizes the vast size of the harbor that seems to almost entirely circle Boston. The Charles River in the upper right hand corner of the map appears a tiny detail. The rest of this page examines some of the ways that the water around Boston impacted the Revolution by looking at the Boston harbor, Paul Revere's crossing the Charles to begin his famous ride, and the Siege of Boston in 1775 and 1776.

Harboring the Revolution

  • Information on the most famous Revolutionary event in the waters around Boston from the "Inventing New England" Tea Museum.
  • An engraving by Paul Revere of British troops entering the Boston harbor in 1768.
  • A 1775 map of Boston showing the harbor and islands around the city.

Revere's River Ride

  • John Singleton Coplyey's 1768 Portrait of Paul Revere.
  • Letter from Revere to Dr. Jeremy Belknap describing his crossing of the Charles River and the rest of his ride. From the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  • Longfellow's Poem, "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere." The third stanza recalls Revere's row across the Charles under the guns of the H.M.S. Somerset.
  • A Map of Revere's ride showing the Charles River from the Paul Revere House website.
  • An Interactive website allowing user to ride along with Paul Revere across the Charles.
  • Information on Charles River tides on the night of April 18, 1775, when Revere and the British rowed across from Boston.
  • A map of the British Expedition to Concord, showing their crossing of the Charles just hours after Revere.
  • The Paul Revere Park, created along the Charles River in Charlestown as part of the Big Dig.
  • According to the website of the Northeastern University Boathouse, Paul Revere created competitive rowing: "Competitive rowing made its debut on the eve of April 18, 1775 when Paul Revere did a power 20 across the Charles River basin to Cambridge to warn the countryside of the oncoming Brits."

The Siege across the River

The Charles River affected military strategy during the Siege of Boston. The location of the river created a natural boundary between the British soldiers besieged inside Boston, and the Americans surrounding them at camps in Cambridge and Roxbury. In the winter of 1775/6, the Americans considered a plan to attack the city by marching soldiers across the ice. So too, they constantly worried that the British might attack them. The shape of the river mattered too. The Charles was not deep enough for the British fleet to sail up, which kept the American camps out of the range of British bombardment. The most famous battle of the Siege of Boston was the Battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775, when the British Regulars crossed the Charles from Boston to attack American positions in Charlestown. But there was other fighting before and after then all around the River.


Historic Documents about Revere's Ride

With so many interpretations of the events of the famous ride from Boston to Lexington, many of which were pure speculations, the only way to set the facts straight is to turn attention to the account of Paul Revere himself. Luckily such account exists and not just one. The first records of Revere himself writing about the ride were the draft and the final depositions dated 1775. These short memos were written upon the request of the Massachusetts Provisional Congress as part of the investigation to prove that the British Soldiers had fired the first shot. Other eyewitnesses of Lexington Green were also deposed.

The second document is more complete but was written 23 years after the fact. It was a letter from Paul Revere to Jeremy Belknap, Corresponding Secretary of the Massachusetts Historical Society dated in 1798.

Other than the accounts written by the Midnight Rider himself, several other manuscripts survived to give us the opportunity to visualize what occurred in 1775 through the eyes of contemporaries. Especially interesting are the ones written right around that time and preferably unbiased by political views of either side. One of such document is the down-to-business order given by General Cage, the commander of British regulars in Boston to march to Concord to confiscate weapons.


A Letter from Col. Paul Revere to the Corresponding Secretary Jeremy Belknap on the Battle of Lexington

Having a little leisure, I wish to fullfill my promise, of giving you some facts, and Anecdotes, prior to the Battle of Lexington, which I do not remember to haveseen in any history of the American Revolution.

In the year 1773 I was imployed by the Select men of the Town of Boston to carry the Account of the Destruction of the Tea to New-York and afterwards, 1774, to Carry their dispatches to New-York and Philadelphia for Calling a Congress and afterwards to Congress, several times.* [This asterisk points to a note in the left margin written by Jeremy Belknap: “Let the narrative begin here.”] In the Fall of 1774 & Winter of 1775 I was one of upwards of thirty, cheifly mechanics, who formed our selves in to a Committee for the purpose of watching the Movements of the British Soldiers, and gaining every intelegence of the movements of the Tories. We held our meetings at the Green-Dragon Tavern. We were so carefull that our meetings should be kept Secret that every time we met, every person swore upon the Bible, that they would not discover any of our transactions, But to Messrs. Hancock, Adams, Doctors Warren, Church, & one or two more. About November, when things began to grow Serious, a Gentleman who had Conections with the Tory party, but was a Whig at heart, aquainted me, that our meetings were discovered, & mentioned the identical words that were spoken among us the Night before. We did not then distrust Dr. Church, but supposed it must be some one among us.

We removed to another place, which wethought was more secure: but here we found that all our transactions were communicated to Governor Gage. (This came to me through the then SecretaryFlucker He told it to the Gentleman mentioned above). It was then a common opinion, that there was a Traytor in the provincial Con gress, & that Gage was posessed of all their Secrets. (Church was a member of that Congress for Boston.) In the Winter, towards the Spring, we fre- quently took Turns, two and two, to Watch the Soldiers, By patroling the Streets all night. The Saturday Night preceding the 19th of April, about 12 oClock at Night, the Boats belonging to the Transports were all launched, & carried under the Sterns of the Men of War. (They had been previously hauld up & repaired). We likewise found that the Grenadiers and light Infantry were all taken off duty.

From these movements, we expected something serious was [to] be transacted. On Tuesday evening, the 18th, it was observed, that a number of Soldiers were marching towards the bottom of the Common. About 10 o’Clock, Dr. Warren Sent in great haste for me, and beged that I would imediately Set off for Lexington, where Messrs. Hancock & Adams were, and acquaint them of the Movement, and that it was thought they were the objets. When I got to Dr. Warren’s house, I found he had sent an express by land to Lexington – a Mr. Wm. Daws. The Sunday before, by desire of Dr. Warren, I had been to Lexington, to Mess. Hancock and Adams, who were at the Rev. Mr. Clark’s. I returned at Nightthro Charlestown there I agreed with a Col. Conant, & some other Gentle men,in Charleston, that if the British went out by Water, we would shew two Lanthorns in the North Church Steeple & if by Land, one, as a Signal for we were aprehensive it would be di ficult to Cross the Charles River, or git over Boston neck. I left Dr. Warrens, called upon a friend, and desired him to make the Signals. I then went Home, took my Boots and Surtout, and went to the Northpart of the Town, where I had kept a Boat two friends rowed me across Charles River, a little to the eastward where the Somerset Man of War lay. It was then young flood, the Ship was winding, & the moon was Rising. They landed me on Charlestown side. When I got into Town, I met Col. Conant, & several othersthey said they had seen our signals. I told them what was Acting, & went to git me a Horse I got a Horse of Deacon Larkin. While the Horse was preparing, Richard Devens, Esq. who was one of the Committee of Safty, came to me, & told me, that he came down the Road from Lexington, after Sundown, that evening that He met ten British Officers, all well mounted, & armed, going up the Road. I set off upon a very good Horse it was then about 11 o’Clock, & very pleasant. After I had passed Charlestown Neck, & got nearly opposite where Mark was hung in chains, I saw two men on Horse back, under a Tree. When I got near them, I discovered they were British officer. One tryed to git a head of Me, & the other to take me. I turned my Horse very quick, & Galloped towards Charlestown neck, and then pushed for the Medford Road. The one who chasedme, endeavoring to Cut me off, got into a Clay pond, near where the new Tavern is now built. I got clear of him, and went thro Medford, over the Bridge, & up to Menotomy. In Medford, I awaked the Captain of the Minute men & after that, I alarmed almost every House, till I got to Lexington. I found Mrs. Messrs. Hancock & Adams at the Rev. Mr. Clark’s I told them my errand, and inquired for Mr. Daws they said he had not been there I related the story of the two officers, & supposed that He must have been stopped, as he ought to have been there before me. After I had been there about half an Hour, Mr. Daws came after we refreshid our selves, weand set off for Concord, to secure the Stores, &c. there. We were overtaken by a young Docter Prescot, whom we found to be a high Son of Liberty. I told them of the ten officers that Mr. Devens mett, and that it was pro- bable we might be stoped before we got to Concord for I supposed that after Night, they divided them selves, and that two of them had fixed themselves in such passages as weremost likely to stop any intelegence going to Concord. I likewise mentioned, that we had better allarm all the In- habitents till we got to Concord the youngDoctor much ap- proved of it, and said, he would stop with either of us, for thepeople between that & Concord knew him, & would give the more credit to what we said. We had got nearly half way. Mr Daws & the Doctor stoped to allarm the people of a House: I was about one hundred Rod a head, when I saw two men, in nearly the same situation as those officer were, near Charlestown. I called for the Doctor & Daws to come up – were two & we would have them in an Instant I was surrounded by four – they had placed themselves in a Straight Road, that inclined each way they had taken down a pair of Barrs on the North side of the Road, & two of them were under a tree in the pasture. The Docter being foremost, he came up and we tryed to git past them but they being armed with pis- tols & swords, they forced us in to the pasture -the Docter jum- ped his Horse over a low Stone wall, and got to Concord.

I observed a Wood at a Small distance, & made for that. When I got there, out Started Six officers, on Horse back, and orderd me to dismount-one of them, who appeared to have the command, examined me, where I came from, & what my Name Was? I told him. it was Revere, he as- ked if it was Paul? I told him yes He asked me if I was an express? I answered in the afirmative. He demanded what time I left Boston? I told him and aded, that their troops had catched aground in passing the River, and that There would be five hundred Americans there in a short time, for I had alarmed the Country all the way up. He imediately rode towards those who stoppd us, when all five of them came down upon a full gallop one of them, whom I afterwards found to be Major Mitchel, of the 5th Regiment, Clapped his pistol to my head, called me by name, & told me he was going to ask me some questions, & if I did not give him true answers, he would blow my brains out. He then asked me similar questions to those above. He then orderd me to mount my Horse, after searching me for arms. He then orderd them to advance, & to lead me in front. When we got to the Road, they turned down towards Lexington. When we had got about one Mile, the Major Rode up to the officer that was leading me, & told him to give me to the Sergeant. As soon as he took me, the Major orderd him, if I attempted to run, or any body insulted them, to blow my brains out. We rode till we got near Lexington Meeting-house, when the Militia fired a Voley of Guns, which ap- peared to alarm them very much. The Major inqui- red of me how far it was to Cambridge, and if there were any other Road? After some consultation, the Major

Major Rode up to the Sargent, & asked if his Horse was tired? He told answeredhim, he was – (He was a Sargent of Grenadiers, and had a small Horse) – then, said He, take that man’s Horse. I dismounted, & the Sargent mounted my Horse, when they all rode towards Lexington Meeting-House. I went across the Burying-ground, & some pastures, & came to the Revd. Mr. Clark’s House, where I found Messrs. Hancok & Adams. I told them of my treatment, & they concluded to go from that House to wards Woburn. I went with them, & a Mr. Lowell, who was a Clerk to Mr. Hancock. When we got to the House where they intended to stop, Mr. Lowell & I my self returned to Mr. Clark’s, to find what was going on. When we got there, an elderly man came in he said he had just come from the Tavern, that a Man had come from Boston, who said there were no British troops coming. Mr. Lowell & my self went towards the Tavern, when we met a Man on a full gallop, who told us the Troops were coming up the Rocks. We afterwards met another, who said they were close by. Mr. Lowell asked me to go to the Tavern with him, to a Bit a Trunk of papers belonging to Mr. Hancock. We went up Chamber & while we were giting the Trunk, we saw the British very near, upon a full March. We hurried to wards Mr. Clark’s House. In our way, we passed through the Militia. There were about 50. When we had got about 100 Yards from the meeting-House the British Troops appeard on both Sides of the Meeting-House. In their

In their Front was an Officer on Horse back. They made a Short Halt when I saw, & heard, a Gun fired, which appeared to be a Pistol. Then I could distinguish two Guns, & then a Continual roar of Musquetry When we made off with the Trunk.

As I have mentioned Dr. Church, perhaps it might not be disagreeable to mention some Matters of my own knowledge, respecting Him. He appeared to be a highson of Liberty. He frequented all the places where they met, Was incouraged by all the leaders of the Sons of Liberty, & it appeared he was respected by them, though I knew that Dr. Warren had not the greatest affection for him. He was esteemed a very capable writer, especially in verese and as the Whig partyneeded every Strenght, they feared, as well as courted Him. Though it was known, that some of the Liberty Songs, which We composed, were parodized by him, in favor of the British, yet none dare charge him with it. I was a constant &critical observer of him, and I must say, that I never thought Him a man of Principle and I doubted much in my own mind, wether He was a real Whig. I knew that He kept company with a Capt. Price, a half-pay British officer, & thatHe frequently dined with him, & Robinson, one of the Commissi -oners. I know that one of his intimate aquaintances asked him why he was so often with Robinson and Price? His answer was, that He kept Company with them on purpose to find out their plans. The day after the Battle of Lexington, I came across met him in Cambridge, when He shew me some blood on his stocking, which he said spirted on him from a Man who was killed near him, as he was urging the Militia on. I well remember, that I argued with my self, if a Man will risque his life in a Cause, he must be a Friend to that cause & I never suspected him after, till He was charged with being a Traytor.

The same day I met Dr. Warren. He was President of the Committee of Safety. He engaged me as a Messinger, to do the out of doors business for that committee which gave me an opportunity of being frequently with them. The Friday evening after, about sun set, I was sitting with some, or near all that Committee, in their room, which was at Mr. Hastings’s House at Cambridge. Dr.Church, all at once, started up – Dr. Warren, said He, I am determined to go intoBoston tomorrow – (it set them all a stairing) – Dr. Warren replyed, Are you serious, Dr. Church? they will Hang you if they catch you in Boston. He replyed, I am serious, and am determined to go at all adventures. After a considerableconversation, Dr. Warren said, If you are determined, let us make some business for you. They agreed that he should go to Bit medicine for their & our Wounded officers. He went the next morning & I think he came back on Sunday evening. After He had told the Committee how things were, I took him a side, & inquired particularly how they treated him? he said, that as soon as he got to their lines onthe Boston Neck, they made him a prisoner, & carried him to General Gage, where He was examined, & then He was sent to Gould’s Barracks, & was not suffered to go home but once.

After He was taken up, for holding a Correspondence with the Brittish, I came a Cross Deacon Caleb Davis-we entred into Conversation about Him-He told me, that the morning Church went into Boston, He (Davis) received a Bilet for General Gage-(he then did not know that Church was in Town)-When he got to the General’s House, he was told, the General could not be spoke with, that He was in private with a Gentle man that He waited near half an Hour,-When General Gage & Dr. Church came out of a Room, discoursing together, like like persons who had been long aquainted. He ap -peared to be quite surprized at seeing Deacon Davis there that he (Church) went where he pleased, while in Boston, only a Major Caine, one of Gage’s Aids, went with him. I was told by another person whom I could depend upon, that he saw Church go in to GeneralGage’s House, at the above time that He got out of the Chaise and went up thesteps more like a Man that was aquainted, than a prisoner. Sometime after, perhaps a Year or two, I fell in company with a Gentleman who studied withChurch -in discoursing about him, I related what I have men tioned above He said, He did not doubt that He was in the Interest of the Brittish & that it was He who informed Gen. Gage That he knew for Certain, that a Short time before the Battle of Lexing ton, (for He then lived with Him, & took Care of his Business & Books) He had no money by him, and was much drove for money that all at once, He had several Hundred New Brittish Guineas and that He thought at the time, where they came from.

Thus, Sir, I have endeavoured to give you a Short detail of some matters, ofwhich perhaps no person but my self have have documents, or knowledge. I have men tioned some names which you are aquainted with: I wish you would Ask them, if they can remember the Circumstances I alude to.

I am, Sir, with every Sentment of esteem, Your Humble Servant,
Paul Revere


The Revolutionary War

How he got involved in the independence effort?

  • Through business and social connections, such as being a member of the Masonic Lodge of St. Andrew, Paul Revere became friends with numerous people who later became leaders of the Revolutionary War, including Dr. Joseph Warren who was the leader of the Boston Sons of Liberty.
  • As a copperplate engraver, Revere began producing political engravings that supported the Patriots' cause. He produced a number of political engravings and cartoons that influenced many colonists in their thinking toward Great Britain. His most famous engraving was one of the Boston Massacre .
  • After the Boston Tea Party, Revere became a messenger for the Boston Committee of Public Safety, often delivering messages to New York and Philadelphia about the events unfolding in Boston.

Did he see military action during the war?

  • Paul Revere served in several military positions but none with great distinction, nor did he see much action, however he did play an important role in other ways:
  • Paul Revere may have been present during the Boston Massacre on March 5, 1770. We know this from a detailed map of the scene that he drew.
  • Paul Revere was one of the ringleaders of the Boston Tea Party on May 10, 1773. After the Tea Party, he was sent by the citizens of Boston to deliver news of the party to the other colonists in New York and Philadelphia. When he returned, he was appointed one of 25 men by the citizens of Boston to stand guard over the ship Dartmouth, one of the tea bearing vessels, in order to prevent the overexcited townspeople from doing further damage to the ship.
  • Paul Revere organized the Mechanics, a group that grew out of the Boston Sons of Liberty. The group established an intelligence network that monitored the actions of the British army in Boston with regular patrols and then sent news of the movements to patriot leaders. This is the organization that discovered that British troops were planning to march on Lexington and Concord on the evening of April 18, 1775. Paul Revere was sent with the information to warn Samuel Adams and John Hancock in Lexington, the occasion of his famous midnight ride.
  • In December 1774, the patriot intelligence network in Boston learned that the British would likely send reinforcements to Fort William and Mary at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The British had a large store of ammunition there and they feared the colonists might try to capture it. Paul Revere was sent from Boston to warn the patriots in Portsmouth that reinforcements were on the way. In response, patriots in the vicinity overwhelmed the fort and captured the ammunition. This was the first instance of force used against the British by the colonists. The ammunition was later used by the colonists against the British at the Battle of Bunker Hill.
  • Paul Revere played a key part in the events leading up to the Battles of Lexington and Concord. On April 18, 1775 Paul Revere rode from Boston to Lexington with William Dawes to warn the patriots the British were coming to capture their leaders and their military supplies. After reaching Lexington, Revere, Dawes and Samuel Prescott rode on to warn those along the way to Concord, but they were stopped by a British patrol. Dawes escaped and turned back toward Lexington. Prescott escaped and went on to Concord. Paul Revere was captured by the patrol and questioned, but was later abandoned as the Battle of Lexington Green began. In addition, Paul Revere had made the journey to Lexington and Concord two days before as well, to warn the patriots that the British would be moving soon. Because of this trip, people across the countryside were already prepared for action when the troops actually moved on the 18th and most of the ammunition had already been removed from Concord. Read more about Paul Revere's Ride here and look at a Paul Revere's ride map here.
  • As a courier for the Boston Committee of Correspondence and the Massachusetts Committee of Safety, Paul Revere delivered numerous messages to and from these groups to other patriots around New England. He delivered the news of the Boston Tea Party to New York and to Congress in Philadelphia. Revere also delivered a message to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, warning of an impending British invasion. In all, Paul Revere was sent on 18 such missions.
  • In late 1775, Paul Revere was sent by the Massachusetts Provincial Congress to Philadelphia to learn about how to set up a gun powder plant. The only operating powder mill in the colonies was in Philadelphia and the colonists were in severe need of more. The mill was owned by a man named Oswald Eve. Congress requested that Mr. Eve allow Mr. Revere to tour the mill and instruct him on how to set up another like it in Massachusetts. You can read the letter from Congress to Oswald Eve here. Mr. Eve allowed Revere to tour the plant, but would not tell him the secrets of making gun powder since he didn't want another mill competing with his own. Revere was already an accomplished metallurgist, chemist and mechanic, however, and he learned enough on his tour of the mill to begin operations at an abandoned powder mill in Canton, Massachusetts. In addition to overseeing the construction of the powder mill, Paul Revere oversaw the building of cannons for the Continental Congress.
  • Paul Revere was also employed by the Continental Congress and the State of Massachusetts to engrave and print the notes that were used in place of money. He printed millions for the colonists.
  • After the British abandoned Boston in March 1776, Paul Revere was employed by General George Washington to repair the cannons at Castle William, renamed Fort Independence. This was a British fort that guarded Boston Harbor.
  • In April 1776, Revere was commissioned a Major of Infantry in Massachusetts militia.
  • In November 1776, he was commissioned Lieutenant Colonel of Artillery, where he served at Castle William (Fort Independence), defending Boston Harbor.
  • On August 27, 1777, Lieutenant Colonel Paul Revere was given command of a large contingent of troops to march to Worcester to take command of the British soldiers taken captive at the Battle of Bennington by General John Stark.
  • On July, 1778, Lieutenant Colonel Paul Revere and his son, who was a lieutenant and about 17 years old, were sent to to reinforce General John Sullivan at Newport, Rhode Island. The colonists were unable to recapture Newport and Revere was home in Boston by September.
  • September 1, 1778, he became Commander of Fort Independence.
  • Summer 1779, Lieutenant Colonel Paul Revere was placed in command of the artillery train for the Penobscot Expedition to drive the British from Penobscot Bay, Maine (then part of Massachusetts). This turned out to be a disastrous expedition and was the worst US naval defeat in American history until Pearl Harbor. Paul Revere was charged with insubordination for several alleged offenses during this mission and was dismissed from the militia. He was exonerated from all charges after three years of trying to get a fair court martial.

Finding libraries that hold this item.

Genre/Form: History
Personal narratives
Sources
Document Type: Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Paul Revere Jeremy Belknap

Abstract:

The third account was written ca. 1798 in reply to a request by Jeremy Belknap, corresponding secretary of the Mass. Historical Society. In his letter to Jeremy Belknap, Paul Revere fulfills his "promise, of giving you some facts, and Anecdotes, prior to the Battle of Lexington . "


Our History

Built in 1823 and in operation by 1828, the Belknap Mill replaced a wooden mill owned by Caniel Avery and, even earlier, Stephen Perley. The wooden mill had burned in 1811, and the investors, who operated mills in Lowell, Massachusetts, replaced the building with an industrial structure that was very modern for its time. The Belknap Mill copied a mill built in 1813 in Waltham, Massachusetts. The Waltham Mill was the first American mill to integrate the entire textile manufacturing process, from raw cotton to the finished cloth, under one roof. This mill "launched the Industrial Revolution in America." Like the Waltham Mill, the Belknap Mill is made of brick and post and beam construction. Wooden columns support the open floor plan. Exposed joists (horizontal beams) support the floors and ceilings. Multiple windows and the "double roof" provided natural light before the days of electricity. A waterwheel originally powered machines for weaving plain cloth.

This type of architecture became common throughout northern New England, but today the Belknap Mill is the only remaining example. While other mills burned to the ground, were razed or were renovated, the exterior of the Belknap Mill has remained unchanged. Today, the Belknap Mill is now the sole example from the first stage of the industrial revolution. The bell in the tower was cast by George Holbrook, an apprentice to Paul Revere. Dr. Richard Candee, director of Preservations Studies at Boston University now retired, has called the Belknap Mill the "nation's most important mill." Robert Vogel, while a curator at the Smithsonian, described the Belknap Mill as the oldest unaltered brick textile mill in the United States.

Early Settlement of Laconia

As were many communities along the east coast, Laconia was settled because of its river system. Nearly 10,000 years ago, ancestors of the Winnipesaukee tribe of the Penacook Confederacy used the river as a source of food. The Weirs, which is now on the north end of Laconia, was named after the fishing weirs that the Indians built to catch fish. Aquadoctan, the tribe's key fishing station, was one of many fishing sites between Lake Winnipesaukee and Lake Opechee. By 1696, shortly after European discovery, Aquadoctan was deserted.

While Indians settle here during seasonal runs of migrating fish, they also shared the fishing rights among several villages. White settlers, on the other hand, used the river to divide the land and establish permanent settlements. Laconia's first log cabin was built in 1766. By 1815, "Meredith Bridge," as Laconia was called until 1855, had several stores and mechanic shops and 15 houses. The Belknap Mill, under construction, would become one of New Hampshire's 30 cotton and woolen factories.

Industrial Development in Laconia

In 1797, Daniel Avery, the owner of the wooden mill that preceded the Belknap Mill, built a dam in what is now downtown Laconia. Laconia's first businesses included a blacksmith shop, a tannery, a sawmill, a cotton mill, a linseed oil mill and distillery and used the Winnipesaukee River for waterpower. After the railroad reached Laconia in 1848, larger industries were established here. The C. Ranlet Car Manufacturing Company, which made railroad and trolley cars, moved to Laconia in 1848. The town became a center for industrial knitting, with companies manufacturing clothing, machines, needles, machine parts and boxes for shipping. Local entrepreneurs patented several knitting machines and knitting machine improvements. Scott & Williams, a leading manufacturer of knitting machines, moved from the Boston area to Laconia in 1910 and became Laconia's largest employer, with 2,200 employees and clients worldwide.

After 1945, many mill businesses closed or moved away. Steam, and later electricity, had replaced water as a source of power. Cheaper labor was found elsewhere. The river was redolent with human and chemical waste. Downtown was filled with obsolete buildings.

Urban Renewal and Tourism in Laconia

In 1965, the city adopted an Urban Renewal plan, funded in part by the federal government, to improve conditions downtown and attract shoppers and businesses. The city replaced many buildings, including several mill structures surrounding the Belknap Mill, with the Laconia Mall, Sunrise Towers, Stewart Park, City Hall, a parking garage and parking lots. The canal, which traveled through downtown, was enclosed. Organizations cleaned up the river, which is now used for fishing, boating and swimming.

The Belknap Mill, along with the neighboring Busiel Mill (built in 1853) were saved and adapted for other uses by the Save the Mill Society in 1970, which later became the Belknap Mill Society.


Paul Revere's Personal Account

A LETTER FROM COL. PAUL REVERE TO THE CORRESPONDING SECRETARY

Having a little leisure, I wish to fullfill my promise, of giving you some facts, and Anecdotes, prior to the Battle of Lexington, which I do not remember to have seen in any history of the American Revolution.

In the year 1773 I was imployed by the Select men of the Town of Boston to carry the Account of the Destruction of the Tea to New-York and afterwards, 1774, to Carry their dispatches to New-York and Philadelphia for Calling a Congress and afterwards to Congress, several times. In the Fall of 1774 and Winter of 1775 I was one of upwards of thirty, cheifly mechanics, who formed our selves in to a Committee for the purpose of watching the Movements of the British Soldiers, and gaining every intelegence of the movements of the Tories. We held our meetings at the Green-Dragon Tavern. We were so carefull that our meetings should be kept Secret that every time we met, every person swore upon the Bible, that they would not discover any of our transactions, But to Messrs. HANCOCK, ADAMS, Doctors WARREN, CHURCH, and one or two more.

About November, when things began to grow Serious, a Gentleman who had Conections with the Tory party, but was a Whig at heart, acquainted me, that our meetings were discovered, and mentioned the identical words that were spoken among us the Night before. We did not then distrust Dr. Church, but supposed it must be some one among us. We removed to another place, which we thought was more secure: but here we found that all our transactions were communicated to Governor Gage. (This came to me through the then Secretary Flucker He told it to the Gentleman mentioned above). It was then a common opinion, that there was a Traytor in the provincial Congress, and that Gage was posessed of all their Secrets. (Church was a member of that Congress for Boston.) In the Winter, towards the Spring, we frequently took Turns, two and two, to Watch the Soldiers, By patroling the Streets all night. The Saturday Night preceding the 19th of April, about 12 oClock at Night, the Boats belonging to the Transports were all launched, and carried under the Sterns of the Men of War. (They had been previously hauld up and repaired). We likewise found that the Grenadiers and light Infantry were all taken off duty.

From these movements, we expected something serious was [to] be transacted. On Tuesday evening, the 18th, it was observed, that a number of Soldiers were marching towards the bottom of the Common. About 10 o'Clock, Dr. Warren Sent in great haste for me, and beged that I would imediately Set off for Lexington, where Messrs. Hancock and Adams were, and acquaint them of the Movement, and that it was thought they were the objects. When I got to Dr. Warren's house, I found he had sent an express by land to Lexington - a Mr. Wm. Daws. The Sunday before, by desire of Dr. Warren, I had been to Lexington, to Mess. Hancock and Adams, who were at the Rev. Mr. Clark's. I returned at Night thro Charlestown there I agreed with a Col. Conant, and some other Gentlemen, that if the British went out by Water, we would shew two Lanthorns in the North Church Steeple and if by Land, one, as a Signal for we were aprehensive it would be dificult to Cross the Charles River, or git over Boston neck. I left Dr. Warrens, called upon a friend, and desired him to make the Signals. I then went Home, took my Boots and Surtout, and went to the North part of the Town, Where I had kept a Boat two friends rowed me across Charles River, a little to the eastward where the Somerset Man of War lay. It was then young flood, the Ship was winding, and the moon was Rising. They landed me on Charlestown side. When I got into Town, I met Col. Conant, and several others they said they had seen our signals. I told them what was Acting, and went to git me a Horse I got a Horse of Deacon Larkin. While the Horse was preparing, Richard Devens, Esq. who was one of the Committee of Safty, came to me, and told me, that he came down the Road from Lexington, after Sundown, that evening that He met ten British Officers, all well mounted, and armed, going up the Road.

I set off upon a very good Horse it was then about 11 o'Clock, and very pleasant. After I had passed Charlestown Neck, and got nearly opposite where Mark was hung in chains, I saw two men on Horse back, under a Tree. When I got near them, I discovered they were British officers. One tryed to git a head of Me, and the other to take me. I turned my Horse very quick, and Galloped towards Charlestown neck, and then pushed for the Medford Road. The one who chased me, endeavoring to Cut me off, got into a Clay pond, near where the new Tavern is now built. I got clear of him, and went thro Medford, over the Bridge, and up to Menotomy. In Medford, I awaked the Captain of the Minute men and after that, I alarmed almost every House, till I got to Lexington. I found Messrs. Hancock and Adams at the Rev. Mr. Clark's I told them my errand, and inquired for Mr. Daws they said he had not been there I related the story of the two officers, and supposed that He must have been stopped, as he ought to have been there before me. After I had been there about half an Hour, Mr. Daws came we refreshid our selves, and set off for Concord, to secure the Stores, &c. there. We were overtaken by a young Docter Prescot, whom we found to be a high Son of Liberty. I told them of the ten officers that Mr. Devens mett, and that it was probable we might be stoped before we got to Concord for I supposed that after Night, they divided them selves, and that two of them had fixed themselves in such passages as were most likely to stop any intelegence going to Concord. I likewise mentioned, that we had better allarm all the Inhabitents till we got to Concord the young Doctor much approved of it, and said, he would stop with either of us, for the people between that and Concord knew him, and would give the more credit to what we said. We had got nearly half way. Mr Daws and the Doctor stoped to allarm the people of a House: I was about one hundred Rod a head, when I saw two men, in nearly the same situation as those officers were, near Charlestown. I called for the Doctor and Daws to come up in an Instant I was surrounded by four they had placed themselves in a Straight Road, that inclined each way they had taken down a pair of Barrs on the North side of the Road, and two of them were under a tree in the pasture. The Docter being foremost, he came up and we tryed to git past them but they being armed with pistols and swords, they forced us in to the pasture the Docter jumped his Horse over a low Stone wall, and got to Concord. I observed a Wood at a Small distance, and made for that. When I got there, out Started Six officers, on Horse back, and orderd me to dismount one of them, who appeared to have the command, examined me, where I came from, and what my Name Was? I told him. He asked me if I was an express? I answered in the afirmative. He demanded what time I left Boston? I told him and aded, that their troops had catched aground in passing the River, and that There would be five hundred Americans there in a short time, for I had alarmed the Country all the way up. He imediately rode towards those who stoppd us, when all five of them came down upon a full gallop one of them, whom I afterwards found to be Major Mitchel, of the 5th Regiment, Clapped his pistol to my head, called me by name, and told me he was going to ask me some questions, and if I did not give him true answers, he would blow my brains out. He then asked me similar questions to those above. He then orderd me to mount my Horse, after searching me for arms. He then orderd them to advance, and to lead me in front. When we got to the Road, they turned down towards Lexington. When we had got about one Mile, the Major Rode up to the officer that was leading me, and told him to give me to the Sergeant. As soon as he took me, the Major orderd him, if I attempted to run, or any body insulted them, to blow my brains out. We rode till we got near Lexington Meeting-house, when the Militia fired a Voley of Guns, which appeared to alarm them very much. The Major inquired of me how far it was to Cambridge, and if there were any other Road? After some consultation, the Major Rode up to the Sargent, and asked if his Horse was tired? He answered him, he was (He was a Sargent of Grenadiers, and had a small Horse) - then, said He, take that man's Horse. I dismounted, and the Sargent mounted my Horse, when they all rode towards Lexington Meeting-House. I went across the Burying-ground, and some pastures, and came to the Revd. Mr. Clark's House, where I found Messrs. Hancock and Adams. I told them of my treatment, and they concluded to go from that House to wards Woburn. I went with them, and a Mr. Lowell, who was a Clerk to Mr. Hancock. When we got to the House where they intended to stop, Mr. Lowell and my self returned to Mr. Clark's, to find what was going on. When we got there, an elderly man came in he said he had just come from the Tavern, that a Man had come from Boston, who said there were no British troops coming. Mr. Lowell and my self went towards the Tavern, when we met a Man on a full gallop, who told us the Troops were coming up the Rocks. We afterwards met another, who said they were close by. Mr. Lowell asked me to go to the Tavern with him, to git a Trunk of papers belonging to Mr. Hancock. We went up Chamber and while we were giting the Trunk, we saw the British very near, upon a full March. We hurried to wards Mr. Clark's House. In our way, we passed through the Militia. There were about 50. When we had got about 100 Yards from the meeting-House the British Troops appeard on both Sides of the Meeting-House. In their Front was an Officer on Horse back. They made a Short Halt when I saw, and heard, a Gun fired, which appeared to be a Pistol. Then I could distinguish two Guns, and then a Continual roar of Musquetry When we made off with the Trunk.

As I have mentioned Dr. Church, perhaps it might not be disagreeable to mention some Matters of my own knowledge, respecting Him. He appeared to be a high son of Liberty. He frequented all the places where they met, Was incouraged by all the leaders of the Sons of Liberty, and it appeared he was respected by them, though I knew that Dr. Warren had not the greatest affection for him. He was esteemed a very capable writer, especially in verse and as the Whig party needed every Strenght, they feared, as well as courted Him. Though it was known, that some of the Liberty Songs, which We composed, were parodized by him, in favor of the British, yet none dare charge him with it. I was a constant and critical observer of him, and I must say, that I never thought Him a man of Principle and I doubted much in my own mind, wether He was a real Whig. I knew that He kept company with a Capt. Price, a half-pay British officer, and that He frequently dined with him, and Robinson, one of the Commissioners. I know that one of his intimate aquaintances asked him why he was so often with Robinson and Price? His answer was, that He kept Company with them on purpose to find out their plans. The day after the Battle of Lexington, I met him in Cambridge, when He shew me some blood on his stocking, which he said spirted on him from a Man who was killed near him, as he was urging the Militia on. I well remember, that I argued with my self, if a Man will risque his life in a Cause, he must be a Friend to that cause and I never suspected him after, till He was charged with being a Traytor.

The same day I met Dr. Warren. He was President of the Committee of Safety. He engaged me as a Messinger, to do the out of doors business for that committee which gave me an opportunity of being frequently with them. The Friday evening after, about sun set, I was sitting with some, or near all that Committee, in their room, which was at Mr. Hastings's House at Cambridge. Dr. Church, all at once, started up - Dr. Warren, said He, I am determined to go into Boston tomorrow (it set them all a stairing) - Dr. Warren replyed, Are you serious, Dr. Church? they will Hang you if they catch you in Boston. He replyed, I am serious, and am determined to go at all adventures. After a considerable conversation, Dr. Warren said, If you are determined, let us make some business for you. They agreed that he should go to git medicine for their and our Wounded officers. He went the next morning and I think he came back on Sunday evening. After He had told the Committee how things were, I took him a side, and inquired particularly how they treated him? he said, that as soon as he got to their lines on Boston Neck, they made him a prisoner, and carried him to General Gage, where He was examined, and then He was sent to Gould's Barracks, and was not suffered to go home but once. After He was taken up, for holding a Correspondence with the Brittish, I came a Cross Deacon Caleb Davis we entred into Conversation about Him He told me, that the morning Church went into Boston, He (Davis) received a Bilet for General Gage (he then did not know that Church was in Town) - When he got to the General's House, he was told, the General could not be spoke with, that He was in private with a Gentleman that He waited near half an Hour, - When General Gage and Dr. Church came out of a Room, discoursing together, like persons who had been long aquainted. He appeared to be quite surprized at seeing Deacon Davis there that he (Church) went where he pleased, while in Boston, only a Major Caine, one of Gage's Aids, went with him. I was told by another person whom I could depend upon, that he saw Church go in to General Gage's House, at the above time that He got out of the Chaise and went up the steps more like a Man that was aquainted, than a prisoner.

Sometime after, perhaps a Year or two, I fell in company with a Gentleman who studied with Church - in discoursing about him, I related what I have mentioned above He said, He did not doubt that He was in the Interest of the Brittish and that it was He who informed Gen. Gage That he knew for Certain, that a Short time before the Battle of Lexington, (for He then lived with Him, and took Care of his Business and Books) He had no money by him, and was much drove for money that all at once, He had several Hundred New Brittish Guineas and that He thought at the time, where they came from.

Thus, Sir, I have endeavoured to give you a Short detail of some matters, of which perhaps no person but my self have documents, or knowledge. I have mentioned some names which you are aquainted with: I wish you would Ask them, if they can remember the Circumstances I alude to.


News and Events

The Belknap Range Conservation Coalition (BRCC) led a guided sunset hike on Piper Mountain, Gilford NH, on June 16, 2019. BRCC members Bev Divaio and Dan Tinkham met hikers at the parking lot at the top of Belknap Carriage Road. Piper Mountain has an elevation of 2044 feet and the trail is .9 miles long. The summit is rocky and flat with great vistas west and east. We enjoyed a nice evening watching the light fade in the west amongst broken clouds. We also played a questions game about the range with prizes sponsored by TD Bank in Gilford and Bolduc Park in Laconia, followed by an explanation of who owns Piper, and what the BRCC is all about. To see the 26 questions and answers, Read More below.

1. Can you name 12 mountains in the Belknap Mountain range?

ROWE: 1680 ft. , GUNSTOCK 2245 ft. , BELKNAP 2382 ft. , PIPER 2044 ft., WHITEFACE 1664 ft., MACK 1945 ft., KLEM 2001 ft., RAND 1883 ft., ANNA 1670 ft., QUARRY W. 1894 ft., STRAIGHTBACK S. 1890 ft., MAJOR 1786 ft. Also Suncook 1851 ft., East Quarry 1890 ft., North Straightback 1910 ft., and Swett 1535 ft.

2. What Boy Scout Camp is located in the Belknap Range?

Griswold Scout Reservation Hidden Valley or Camp Bell

3. On the side of which peak will you find the remains of an 1827 iron mine?

Above the intersection of Hoyt and Belknap Mountain Roads on the west side of Gunstock about 300 feet below the summit. Back side of the top of the Panorama Lift

4. What two mountains have ski trails on them?

5. Name five edible foods growing in the Belknap range?

Black berries, strawberries, raspberries, gooseberries, edible mushrooms, blue berries

6. Where can you see the remains of a collapsed caldera?

A rough circle stretching around most of the range and out to Diamond, Rattlesnake, Ship, and Moose Islands.

7. Where can you find the remains of the first rope tow in the Belknaps?

Back side of Gunstock above the Muehlke Tree farm (320 Belknap Mountain Road)

8. What is the tower on Belknap Mountain used for?

Fire lookout in the dry summer months (Red Flag Days)

9. Name five flowers that could be found in the Belknap Range.

Accept a huge number of answers

10. Which mountain in this range is hiked the most?

Major - Estimated to be over 80,000 per year!

11. Where can you find the remains of an airplane crash where one person died in 1973?

Belknap - on the east side below the fire tower

12. Where can you find the remains of a Quarrying operation?

13. Gunstock Mountain Resort is part of what Recreation Area?

14. Who built the main lodge at Gunstock Mountain Resort?

Gunstock began as a project of the WPA - Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression in the 1930's

15. Which Belknap mountain range mountain is the highest?

Belknap at 2382 ft then Gunstock at 2245 ft ,Piper at 2044 ft, Mt. Klem at 2001 ft., Mt. Mack at 1945 ft, North Straightback at 1910 ft Major at 1786 ft, Whiteface at 1644 , Rowe at 1690 ft

16. Which peaks have little or no view?

17. Name ten mammals that could be seen in the Belknap Range.

Weasels, flying squirrel, red and gray squirrels, bats, chipmunks, otter, moose, fox, porcupine woodchuck, beaver, raccoon, muskrat, rabbits, snowshoe hare, raccoon, coyote, bobcat

18. Which trail in the range is the most hiked?

Blue (main) trail on Mt Major

19. What two hiking badges are available for hiking the Belknaps?

A badge for climbing 12 of the peaks is obtainable through Belknap County Sportsman's Association. The redlining patch is also available through the Belknap Range Trail Tenders (BRATTS).

20. What group of volunteers is very active in maintaining and upgrading the hiking trails in the Belknaps?

Belknap Range Trail Tenders (BRATTS)

21. Who was the Belknap Range and Belknap Mountain named after?

Jeremy Belknap, born 6/4/1744 and died 6/20/ 1798. Dr Jeremy Belknap requested Paul Revere write an account of the events of April 18-19, 1775 and his famous ride to give the alarm that the British were headed to Lexington and Concord. He published the first history of New Hampshire.

22. Name three mountain ranges at least partially visible from Piper Mountain?

Ossipee, Presidential, and Sandwich ranges

23. Name 8 peaks visible from Piper.

Lots, including Mount Monadnock in Jaffrey NH

24. Who created the original trail map and lots of the trails in the Belknap Range?

Dave Roberts, a founding member and director of BRCC, passed away on March 29, 2017. An avid hiker and mountain climber, Dave was also involved with the Lakes Region Conservation Trust and the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests. Dave spent decades exploring the Belknap Range, marking existing trails, blazing new trails, and marking the location of numerous natural and historic features. Using early GPS technology, Dave generated the first hiking trail maps of the Range. Current Belknap Range trail maps are basically updates of Dave's original maps. There is a trail from the parking lot on Reed Road to Quarry Mountain named in his honor.

25. Where in the range were cattle pastured for more than 100 years?

Jail Pasture, where cattle from Gilmanton, Belmont and as far away as Barnstead were walked and then driven to pasture for the summer. It is bounded by Piper, Belknap, and Suncook Mountains.

26. Which mountain has the remains of a stone hut built in the 1920's so that hikers could take shelter?

Mt Major - Mr. Pippen's Hut- George Phippen of Alton built the hut in 1927. The hut's roof blew off that winter and can still can be found in the woods. Mr. Phippen gave the land up for taxes to the Town of Alton. The Town of Alton subsequently gave it to the state of NH.


Watch the video: Midnight Ride Letter to Jeremy Belknap by Paul Revere